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Video Contest: Sounds of Music

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Contest ended

Monday Jun 09, 2014

$1000

Youth Grand Prize

$1000

Adult Grand Prize

$200

Word Winner

T-Shirt

Honorable Mention

T-Shirt

Viewer's Choice

Youth Grand Prize

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Audible

Adult Grand Prize

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Melodious

Word Winner

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Be Audible! by Mi...

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Warble Game Show!

Word Winner

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Discordant No. 7

Word Winner

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The Inflection Rap

Honorable Mention

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Ms Brille's Violi...

Honorable Mention

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Despite the Noise

Viewer's Choice

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Ode to Discordant


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Ukulele (Discordant)

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Some Things Are B...

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Human Beatbox

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Strident Word Video

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Melodious Dreams

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Sister's Diary

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Storm of Glisten

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"A Warble Nightmare"

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Definition: Disco...

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Inflection

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Melodious

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A Strident Televi...

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Audible by Johann...

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Conflicting Infle...

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Refrain

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Project Ed - Melo...

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The Great Dog Whi...

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Discordant Thoughts

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The Word of The D...

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Craig and Melodious

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Discordant Vocals

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Airport Discordance

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Strident Contest ...

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A Short Melodious...

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Hippopotamus video

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A nice piano

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Sounds of Music |...

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The Discordant Date

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Audible Patrick S...

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Tchaikovsky's Mel...

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Letters or Lettuce

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Audible Definition

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The discordant co...

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Chalice from the ...

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Mr. Oxpecker

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Strident

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Audible

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Sounds of Music S...

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The Melodious Mus...

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Refrain - The Sou...

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Melodious

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Danny Boy

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A Story of Barry:...

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The Inflection of...

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The word Inflection

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Discordant Gargoyle

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Audible

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How are you doing...

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Refrain from Refrain

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Audible Adventure

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Sounds of music -...

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ProjectEd Contest...

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Strident

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Defining Melodious

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Strident

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Music Box

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Definition: Strident

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Learning to Listen

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Strident

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Discordant

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Projected - Audible

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What is Inflection

Music. Some say it’s the universal language — the one thing people can appreciate and understand across cultures and countries. Others say music is nearly impossible to describe: there’s a famous saying — “writing about music is like dancing about architecture.” No matter where you fall in the debate, these words help writers describe the power and the mystery of music.

Look at the eight words below. Choose one. Take a close look at the definition in the brief to craft a story that conveys the word’s definition. Then, make a video, one minute or less, that effectively and creatively teaches the meaning of the word you chose. Are you up to the challenge?

In this challenge, choose one of these eight words: melodious, discordant, warble, audible, trill, refrain, strident,and inflection.

Your video must:

  • Last no longer than one minute
  • Define only one word, using the definitions provided
  • Display, at appropriate points, the word, it’s part of speech and definition, and an example sentence

Image Credit: johavel/iStockphoto

1) Melodious (adjective) – song-like, pleasant sounding

A voice like an angel

Thought starter: Have you ever met someone with a voice so sweet, so pleasing, that you could listen to him talk for hours, even if he was giving you bad news? If so, that person’s voice must have been melodious. Make a one-minute video about a person with a melodious voice attempting to deliver bad news to their friends.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word melodious when referring to an especially pleasing or beautiful sound. A chorus, a singer, or a songbird might all make melodious sounds.

2) Discordant (adjective) – harsh sounding, out of tune

Record scratch…

Thought starter: Not everyone can sing like a bird. Some of us can never quite get into tune. If you can’t carry a tune, someone may describe your voice as discordant. Make a one-minute video about a passionate singer with a discordant voice who finally finds a place for himself in an equally tuneless band.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word discordant to describe something that sounds harsh or out of tune. A piano or a violin that hasn’t been tuned in a long time would probably make a discordant noise if you tried to play it.

3) Warble (noun) – a chirp made up of constantly changing notes

Tweet, tweet

Thought starter: Birds are known for their singing abilities and there are many words to describe the sounds that they make. A warble is a noun that means a birdsong made up of constantly changing notes. Make a one-minute video about a bird watcher attempting to trace a rare bird’s warble through a noisy public space.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word warble to describe a bird’s song that sounds like a succession of changing notes. A robin chirping or a lark’s song can be described as a warble but a goose’s loud honk cannot.

4) Audible (adjective) – clear enough to hear

Can you hear me now?

Thought starter: Some sounds are easy to hear and some sounds are difficult to hear. The adjective audible means clear enough to hear. Some sounds are only audible to certain types of animals, though. Make a one-minute video about what would happen if a dog whistle suddenly became audible to humans.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word audible when describing something that’s clear enough to hear. A whisper is barely audible. A fire alarm, on the other hand, needs to be audible in order to be effective.

5) Trill (noun) – high-pitched chirp

Tra-la-la-la-la, la-la-la-la!

Thought starter: A telephone’s ring, a soprano singing scales — these sounds are trills, or high-pitched chirps. Sometimes trills can sound beautiful and sometimes they can sound annoying. Make a one-minute video about someone who can only communicate with a series of trills.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word trill to describe the sound of a trembling, rapid alteration of notes. A pop singer may add a trill to the chorus of a song that she sings.

6) Refrain (noun) – a repeated line (a sentence, phrase, or line of music)

And the chorus goes...

Thought starter: When listening to a song, do you ever hear the same verse again and again? The name of that part of a song is a refrain. A refrain is a repeated line in a song or poem. A song’s chorus can contain a refrain. A poem can have a refrain as well. Make a one-minute video about a songwriter who hears the same silly refrain every time he falls back into a bad habit.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word refrain to describe a repeated line or series of lines, often at the end of a verse of a song or poem. One of the most famous refrains in poetry is in Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven.” The raven in the poem only says “nevermore,” over and over again.

7) Strident (adjective) – harsh and loud

Talking to me? Or through me?

Thought starter: Some voices are so distinct, so harsh and loud, they cut through a crowd. Those voices are strident. Strident describes harsh, loud, and unpleasant sounds. If someone argues with you and raises her voice, you may say her tone has become strident. Make a one-minute video about someone whose voice becomes more and more strident as he or she argues in favor of something ridiculous.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word strident to describe a disagreeable, harsh, or loud sound.

When someone makes a passionate argument, his or her voice may become strident.

8) Inflection (noun) – an emphasis or stress on a word or sound

Say it with feeling

Thought starter: If you speak with an inflection, you accentuate certain words or sounds. An inflection is another word for accent, and it’s a noun that refers to the patterns of tones and pitches in someone’s speech. Make a one-minute video in which one person repeats the word “hippopotamus” with a different inflection each time.

Pro-tip: Writers use the word inflection to describe an emphasis or stress on a word or sound. Someone with a Southern accent may pronounce the word “February” with a different inflection than someone with a German accent.

Submission requirements:

In a video, no longer than 1 minute, you must:

  • Choose only one word from the list provided.
  • Clearly and accurately demonstrate the meaning, pronunciation and correct usage of the word using the definition provided.
  • Display the following as text on screen at appropriate points during your video:
    • The word and its part of speech (noun, adjective or verb).
    • The definition of the word.
    • The word used accurately in a sentence that describes the actions in your video.
  • Meet all official rules and requirements.

Key Dates:

  • April 14, 2014 – Contest opens
  • May 12, 2014 – Last day to submit your video (by 11:59 p.m. ET)
  • May 26, 2014 – Voting closes at 11:59 p.m. ET
  • June 9, 2014 – Winners announced on the Project ED website

Finalist and Winner Judging Criteria:

Videos will be evaluated based on the following criteria, weighed equally:

  • Educational merit and accuracy: Your video achieves the educational goals presented in the contest brief and viewers learn intended material from your video.
  • Creativity and engagement: Your video presents educational content in a memorable way; viewers are compelled to watch the video to completion. Does your video convey its message in an artistic, creative and innovative way?
  • Quality of video production: Your video has high resolution and audio quality, effectively employs visual aesthetics and cinematography and demonstrates production skills.
  • Appropriate content: Your video does not contain indecent, obscene, hateful, defamatory, or offensive material.

In the event of a tie, the tie will be broken on the basis of the tied entrants’ scores in the “Educational merit and accuracy” criteria.

Prizes:

Prizes per contest vary. In most cases, a grand prize will be awarded to one video in the ‘Youth’ category and one in the ‘Adult’ category. All entries are categorized by age of the submitter. Submitters under the age of 18 are placed into the ‘Youth’ category and submitters 18 years or older are placed in the ‘Adult’ category. All prizes with the exception of the 'Viewer's Choice' award are chose by a panel of judges. In the case of winners under the age of 18, prizes will be awarded to a legal parent or guardian. Rules for each contest explain how and when we will notify you and the date the prizes will be announced. Prizes are awarded at Amplify’s discretion and are subject to the applicable district and school policies. Prizes for teachers may be awarded via DonorChoose.org.

Official Requirements:

  • The video’s creator must be 13 or over.
  • Entrants who are minors must obtain a parent’s or guardian’s consent to enter the contest.
  • You must use appropriate language and content.
  • You must properly clear and credit any source film clips, images, or locations you use. To verify winning entries, participants will be asked to submit proof of proper clearances.
  • You can only submit one entry per contest.
  • If you are employed by a school you must ensure your entry into this contest is in compliance with your institution’s policies.
  • Please carefully read the complete rules listed in the Contest Terms.

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